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Big pollack jig info

Discussion in 'Metal Lures' started by {name}, Jul 20, 2015.

  1. Sea Trout

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    I recently spent a few hours catching some hard fighting pollack on 60gm FBM but I was out fished by two other guys using expensive jigs (£12+). I've found some fairly cheap jigs and separately some assist hooks rigs on fleabay. Should I buy them or are they cheap shit and not worth it?

    http://pages.ebay.com/link/?nav=item.view&alt=web&id=190874291644&globalID=EBAY-GB

    http://pages.ebay.com/link/?nav=item.view&alt=web&id=391030596344&globalID=EBAY-GB

    Thanks

    Mike


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  2. Bass

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    I'm assuming you were fishing off a boat. The jig and the technique used makes a big difference. Slow pitch jigging is essentially unknown in UK waters is an absolutely deadly technique. The rod, the reel, line, jig selections, weight of jig, movement of current, fishing depth and the manner in which the jig is "worked," is very,very important. There is no "one-size-fits-all." Yes, slow pitch jigging performed by competent anglers will out fish other deep methods everyday....period. I suggest you check out Japanese Anglers Secrets online, it's an absolute wealth of information.
     
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  3. Sea Trout

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    Yes from a boat, I thought it might be "easier" than that! Lol!! Many thanks though Mike, I'll check it out


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  4. Banned

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    Mike I use the original butterfly jigs and they can be deadly in those circumstances and I also rig a treble on the bottom end ( heavy end )
     
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  5. Banned

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    image.jpg
     
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  6. Banned

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    I do Slow Pitch Jigging from the boat and bought a rod designed for it (thanks Vidar) and some slow pitch jigs, all from Japan. Very effective method which I prefer in the UK over Speed Jigging, which I struggled with TBH.
     
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  7. Perch

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    It's hard to say what those jigs would be like without trying them. I bought some cheapos once and they were a bit soft - one knock or fish and they bent. Once that happens they transform from a fish catching device to a lead weight. A case of caveat emptor I think..
     
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  8. Bass

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    Mike, here are a few suppliers:

    http://www.maltatackle.com/apps/webstore/
    http://www.jiggingworld.com/
    Shimreels on eBay.

    Next time you're offshore bottom wreck/reef fishing; be the guy to get your lure to the bottom first. I see a lot guys cast away from the boat when we reach a spot. I have always immediately dropped my lure to the bottom. Jigging works best when it's aligned vertically.
     
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  9. Wrasse

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    Hi Mike - as I was one of the other guys using the reassuringly expensive jigs and I'm an all things jigging aficionado, a few thoughts from me in no particular order and with very little purpose other than to give you some insight into my mind/personal opinion.....

    I think jig design is pretty important. On Sunday I was using slow jigs that were designed to flutter side to side horizontally on the drop and flip end over end vertically when lifted. There was no bias on the jig (i.e. no heavy end) and I deliberately opted for that type of jig as they do fall slower and with more control - the fish at that time were concentrated in quite a narrow depth range so I wanted to keep the jig 'in the zone' as long as possible. There was some method to my madness.

    The rod I was using was purposely designed to control the jigs, albeit I was fishing slightly over its recommended weighting which compromised an element of control. Personally I would have liked a bit more depth for the slow jigging - we were in between 85-130ft of water which I think is very much at the shallower end of optimum for the jigs to do their thing (at least for the 130g jig I was using). I didn' feel I was totally in control of my jig. For comparison, in Osaka last year I was using 100g in 300ft over slack water and it just felt great, likewise 130g in c. 190-220ft over a south Devon wreck with a bit more tide felt comfortable.

    As Mike says, on its day slow jigging is deadly but on Sunday I'll admit a lighter jig was probably better suited as there was very little tide so it could get down easily enough with very little drift. The fish were also ready to feed which makes a difference - I think any type of metal fished in any style would have performed well on Sunday.

    Forgetting the jigs themselves for a moment, I think the real difference on Sunday were actually the hooks - I was fishing a double assist on one end of the jig, Oz was fishing a single treble on the bottom of a biased jig. His hook up rate was probably much better than mine - I missed a shed load of hits. In hindsight I should have given more thought to hook placement - i.e. as th jig falls horizontally, could I have had better results rigging a single assist from each end?

    On the cost side, I personally think 130g of nicely painted, good quality metal for £12 isn't a bad investment. I lost one jig on Sunday flirting with the bottom but additionally lost two 40g Fiiish Minnows in a similar timespan on another mark. I reckon I lose double the SP's to the reef than I do jigs at a higher net cost to my pocket over time.

    Lastly, aside from potential losses, wear and tear should be a consideration - cheap jigs are generally soft and can get beaten out of shape. In a discipline where I believe jig shape/design is so important, I'm personally not willing to compromise on quality or durability that might affect the action of a well designed lure.....
     
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  10. Bass

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    Great info Matt, well written, cheers.
     
  11. Sea Trout

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    Thanks Matt, great info. As I enjoyed it so much and my budget is tight, I'll start at the cheap end of things, but I'm sure I'll soon end up upgrading (another way of squandering what little spare cash I have!!)


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  12. Bass

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    If you are starting at the cheap end of the scale, check out the Flashmer range. There are plenty of people (me included) that swear by the fish catching ability of these old fashioned looking jigs. Personally I have had pollack to 16 and bass to over 10 on these babies!

    http://www.mrfishjersey.com/metal-lures/flashmer.html
     
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  13. Chub

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    Huge variety of good metals (some copies of big brands) that catch fish here http://www.aliexpress.com/af/metal-...ative_id=SB_20150721155529&isViewCP=y&catId=0
    Have already tried some at the lower weights and very happy with them. Although I agree that big brands offer good gear, I do believe they take the piss some times..! I mean its only a piece of metal.. You cant expect ppl to pay more for it than a Japanese plug!
     
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