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Discussion Starter #1
Hi Guys , I`m new to this site and this type of fishing .

I`m looking to buy some kit and was wondering if the use of Fixed spool or multiplier reel ( small bait casters ) was just down to users preferance or if there was any other reasons for using one or the other , Hope this makes sence !!

thanks Brian
 

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Hey Brian. Welcome to the site!

There are a few on here that do use baitcasters (more for specific jobs than all of the time), but the majority of us use fixed spools. The challenges of fishing on the coast in all sorts of weathers means that fixed spools are generally easier to fish with, are less prone to problems (casting a baitcaster in to the wind isn't so easy, apparently) and are better with lighter lures. In freshwater, baitcasters have a big following - especially in the U.S., but for us here, I think you'll get along much better with a fixed spool.
 

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This is my opinion but it's not gospel. I use both. Baitcasters take some time to get used to, often putting people off at the 1st hurdle. I'd say you could probably use a fixed spool in 99% of the situations you'll find yourself in lure fishing in the UK and you'll cope. The same can't be said for baitcasters unless you've got the time and money to invest in the right kit. They are more application specific as Keith has mentioned. Baitcasters are a stunningly simple way of fishing though and yes you can use them into a head wind but they do need to be matched to the right rod, line and lure to get the best out of them and you'll find you'll need several different combinations to cover the same techniques and styles you'd cover with possibly one or two fixed spool set ups.
 

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I think Andy and the others have pretty much summed it up. I use both too but when I use as multiplier it tends to be for the fun of it. I enjoy using them. Whereas in the past most of the fixed spools available were pretty ordinary compared to the likes of ABU Ambassadeurs that is no longer the case. Current fixed spools are lighter, have better gearing and drags than those of old and the overriding factor is versatility. One fixed spool will likely cover many scenarios you are likely to cover in a days bassing, a multiplier might have shortcomings due to wind or lure size. Both have their place and at the end of the day there are die hards in both camps. I think cost is a factor too, a cheap fixed spool is much easier to use than a cheap multiplier.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Ok there`s something to think about , I usually use multipliers for my beach fishing , and have only ever used fixed spools for carp fishing .

thanks Guys .
 

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Think most of who have sea fished for years before getting in to lures would be in the same boat Brian. Even if it takes you a little while to adjust (won't take long at all), it'll be well worth it. Starting off on a baitcaster and not enjoying it could be enough to put you off the lures - which would be a shame. Fixed spools really are easier for this type of thing :horsesword:
 

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Discussion Starter #9
No , I will take your advice .

Now the mine field of which fixed spool . have you guys any suggestions , I would spend in the region of £120 .
 

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Sounds like you're in Shimano Technium 4000 territory!! And although they never get mentioned, the Daiwa TD-R 3012 (they make a double handle version now as well) would also be worth a look for about the same price. You'll pick a Technium up for about £100 if you look around.
 

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No probs. Front drags are generally used by most in this game. Qute a few reasons really. Nothing major and you could get away with a rear drag if you really wanted one, but... front drags are generally smoother and more powerful. You don't tend to get rear drags on reels past a certain point as front drags excel. Front drags also create a slightly smaller reel. With this type of fishing, your reel will occasionally get a bit of a dunking as well, and I'm not 100% sure, but I expect front drag reels also have fewer spaces for water (and more importantly, salt) to get in.

Anything else just ask.
 

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A cynic might say that rear drags are more for show than actual use. the higher spec the reel is the less likely it is to have a rear drag. A rear drag generally has less space to fit the washers in than a front drag making it more difficult to create the same level of performance.
As far as which model to go for, most popular size is a 3000 Daiwa, 4000 Shimano or equivalent. Most of the top manufacturers make good models in the price range you mention. Look after it and it will last for years.
 
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