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Discussion Starter #1
...sorry "from" lively seas.

I just replied on the handling bass thread, and after reading the other posts I thought about this and decided to put it on a seperate thread - appologies if its been covered before - I did a search and couldnt find anything.
Anywhere here goes;
I think most of us know what we have to do in the best interests of fish once we have them safely landed, but all you guys who use lip grips when fishing from elevated rocky positions - how do you actually land your bass? Surely the level of care you have considered for the fish once its out the water and "yours" should be replicated during the full landing process...ie as, and as soon as, the fish is taken from the water?
I have got one of these lipgrip devices from when I had a kayak where it proved to be 100% excellent. I've also found it to be THE best thing for grabbing and dealing with (especially smaller) bass when deep wading in estuaries/ beaches etc where you dont want to drag the fish all the way back to the shore to deal with it.
I tried using mine from the rocks and to be honest I really struggled with it and found it was a right palarva trying to get the fish to open its moth at the right time and angle to get my grip into it...especially in lively seas!
Given you are a better shot than me, (not difficult I reckon!) and you grab it first time, and this is a serious question, what do you do next?

Does the bail arm get flipped and the pride and joy rod&reel get lobbed into the rocks so you can free up the other hand in order to support the fish properly as you carry it out the splash zone?
...I doubt it somehow.
I bet most of us would use a timely wave to wash the bass onto the rocks before diving in with the boga, and carry or drag the bass to safety by the jaw....sure this is probably done as gently as possible , but only once the rod is carefully put down does the proper fish-care thought-train kick in. Some marks are obviously easier than others, but to get a lively bass to safety from some of the great-looking lively rocky marks we all like to see photos of, to look after youself, the fish and your rod I think we'd need an absolute minimum of 3 hands!

For this reason I still use a landing net - the only disadvantage is they are more cumbersome to carry than a boga, and there is an occasional chance of fin membrane damage, but I find a decent collapsible net a far better option in elevated rock situations. Quicker, less fiddly, and a lot safer; In fact, once you have your bass netted, it and the rod can be carried in the same hand with the fish fully supported, leaving your other hand free to help make your way to somewhere safe in order to unhook it.

As I said, appologies if this has been covered before on here but I'd be genuinely very interested to hear how people manage to do this in these situations with a boga.
Cheers...
 

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Does the bail arm get flipped and the pride and joy rod&reel get lobbed into the rocks so you can free up the other hand in order to support the fish properly as you carry it out the splash zone?
For Kev and myself...

rods and reels are tools. We don't throw them down but the fish takes precedence.
 

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Good post - had one washed up round behind me last year and lost it as the wave took it back out - also had one hooked to my waders (makes a change from my hand mind lol)

what net do you use out of interest & does it go on the d-ring on your back or how do you carry it? - is it mono mesh?

ta
 

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Good post - had one washed up round behind me last year and lost it as the wave took it back out - also had one hooked to my waders (makes a change from my hand mind lol)

what net do you use out of interest & does it go on the d-ring on your back or how do you carry it? - is it mono mesh?

ta
I don't think you count Tom. You've done pretty much all of the bad things that most of us are still hoping will never happen to us :-D:wink:

Tis a very good post though. To be honest, I think I'm lucky in a way that I don't catch many big bass, and its a bit difficult to answer without sounding guilty of fish cruelty at times - if we're all honest. Bad as it sounds, our own safety automatically becomes more of an importance than that of the fish we've just caught at times. Realistically it has to.

If there were more suitable landing nets (longer, cheaper poles) then I'd use one some times. I was going ask too, landing nets are something that never really get advertised or mentioned much, but which one do you use?

I get on fine with a boga mostly.
 

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Hi Ian. I also use a fold up net, hooks onto the ring on the back part of my backpack and I can erect it with a flick of the wrist *ahem*. I now have a Boga as well, and it'll depend on where I intend to fish as to what I take with me. Wading, then Boga everytime, but in swells and awkward rocky areas where a swell may be running, I'll stick to my net. Just dont buy the Rapala ProGuide net, for gods sake!
!
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Cheers Tom/Ben/Mark/Keith,
Do you think those 2 incidents would have happened if you'd have had a decent net waiting to pull the fish straight into?

I have 3 nets at the moment that I use depending on where I am fishing.
The "Irish" net is a Sharpes folding salmon net with an extending handle.
The "local" net is a smaller version of the Irish one.
The other one I have is a large fixed frame one that screws into a 3m telescopic alloy handle - this is for fishing from well up above the sea in swells that are too dangerous to risk getting close enough with the folding ones.
The mesh on the Irish one is made of a softish knotted material and is quite big, the local one is made of the same with smaller mesh size - OK but could do with being bigger, and the fixed one is a bit harsh - I think its a QED replacement I got from Harris Angling about 10 years ago. It is nice big mesh but nasty knotted nylon you could use for trawling.
The big fixed one is only used when I am restricted to fishing one specific mark ie I stay put, and yes the folders are carried on my back usually clipped onto the carry handle at the top of my small rucksack, or the harness of my chest pack if I am using that.
Ideally would go on a D ring on the back of a wading jacket if I had one, but I havent.
If I havent got the rucksack on I will occasionally clip it on the back of my jacket collar...but its a bit of a pain in the back of the head at times. Does anyone know a good stockist of plastic D-rings I could cobble something together with using some old webbing?

Keith - glad to hear you aint throwing them rods around - I didint mean to infer that I just couldnt think of the right words!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
In the past I have tried other nets like the McLean folder that was basic, fool-proof and very light, but it broke, an ABU folding frame one that siezed up and was a bit awkward to deploy, and I remember losing another Sharpes one down a crack into the sea in Ireland once.
The Sharpes or cheaper Wilko basic folding ones with the extending handle seem to be good as long as you keep the sliding mechanism nice and free. I recently bought another cheap folding frame one that will go in the rucksack if I ever have to fly anywhere to fish.
 

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Nice one. I guess landing nets are one of those things that no company really works much on to improve as far as sea fishing goes. Do you consider any of the nets that you use now to be perfect Ian, or are there things that you'd like to see improved upon - design wise? What would make the perfect net in your eyes - as somebody who has experience using them? What would be your ideal lenth of handle (or maximum length if the handle were telescopic)? Do you ever find weight an issue when carrying them? Do the current frames and nets need to be stronger/lighter? Do you think more people would use them if they were easier to carry?
 

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Hi Ben,
I have never been 100% happy with any of them to be honest.
My salmon net is a good net and strong but for bass it could do with a slightly smaller frame and a lighter handle.
The other folding one could do with a slightly bigger frame.
The Mcleans one was really light but was too small and could've done with an extending handle (but that would obviously meant more weight)
The ABU folding frame one I had wasnt very good quality and only lasted a year and had a really long handle.
I think there might be a market for making a lightweight folding net based on a combination of the McLeans locking system and a lightweight alloy or carbon/kevlar extendable handle. It needs to have nice deep net wide treble-friendly mesh.
I'd say the standard extending handle length is sufficient it gives a total length of approx 6 foot from the end of the handle to the front edge of the frame. The weight is not an issue for me personally, the only drawback is if you have to go through hedges over barbed wire fences etc they can be a pain. Tend to carry mine in my rod hand when walking cross country to the mark, quite easy apart from catching the netting in the bushes etc.
Maybe the ideal one already exists but I aint seen it yet. I did see an extendable handled Mcleans one in my local tackle shop but the handle weighed a ton. Maybe it had an inbuilt spring balance like a few of them do, which I suppose is quite handy. Someone will probably post the ideal net up now and I will have to start fretting about needing one!
Plenty of people I know use landing nets for bass. I think if the Henry Gilbys of this world started to use them for bass quite a few lot more people would, thats usually the way it works I think. They are still popular for game fish but there again bass have better mouths for targetting with lip grips. Thats all I know about nets really.
 

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Thanks Ian. I think you're probably right about the use of nets spreading as soon as anybody in the limelight gets in to it. Sooooooooo many things seem to be starting like that these days.

If you look to Japan then there are plenty of amazingly ideal options, but the prices are steep to say the least. here's just one example: http://www.plat.co.jp/shop/catalog/..._838/saltwater-fishing-big/landing-shaft.html

That's a general link but there are some interesting things on there that it'd be really good if they became available here. The folding nets for example (http://www.plat.co.jp/shop/catalog/...hing-big/daiwa-tamo-frame-v4-55-with-net.html). We may not need 5 or 6m landing net poles, but on 3m short telescopic poles (http://www.plat.co.jp/shop/catalog/...water-fishing-big/ks-labo-tamo-shaft-250.html) then we may be getting somewhere. Some of those in the link fold down to about 55cm (18"). And then with the net folded and spring back, you're looking at something that would be easily clipped on your back and used without even thinking about it.

...they're in flippin Japan though - as always :-(

If we could get folding nets like those and stick it on one of these (http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/TUBERTINI-MIN...tingGoods_FishingAcces_RL?hash=item5637bac63b) then we'd have a cheaper model that might just do the job.

I'd be tempted to suggest that the perfect net these days should probably be made of the rubber variety that has become commonplace for coarse fishing over the past few years. it doesn't harm the fish, but keeps its shape well and dries very quickly. If it were made with a wider mesh for sea purposes, then I think it could be great!
 

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Another good thread here, and made me think about a net once more.

I use a Boga, but not ideal for landing a fish in a swell when bending down. So will look into getting a folding net, but nobody sells them where I live, and I think ideally it''s something you need to see in the flesh to get an idea of whether it is suitable for your needs. Either that, or via recommendations.

I don't need anything particularly long, maybe a 3ft handle, but its the folding mechanism and weight that would concern me.

This one looks ok, especially as it says it is generally corrosion resistant:-

http://www.sportfish.co.uk/product/solvkroken-telescopic-nets

Can any of the Saltwater Fly guys recommend one?
 

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I have several nets but the one I have used the most is probably the Harris Angling Lure Net that has 'single filiment' mesh that is designed to stop hooks getting caught up in the mesh etc.
I have had it for about 10 years now and it does the job but is crudely made (a bit rough) and has an extendeble handle.
For rock fishing I need a net sometimes but do also use the Boga when I'm at water level.
 

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Interesting thread Ian and I have to agree with you, nets are definitely the right tool in snotty weather. It is interesting to hear some of the descriptions of the nets and their designs to prevent hook up of the trebles. In particular the knotted one as it was identified possibly as long ago as 15 years that notted nets damage fish and they were banned on all course fishing venues. So all mine are micromesh and knotless but not ideal at all for use with lures. I already have a few minor holes from having to dig hooks out. Are the ones being mentioned like the Harris Angling Lure Net knotless and lure friendly? I might have to invest in one.
 

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Nice one guys. That's the sort of thing we need to know about - with recommendations.

Do these nets hold much water, or are they quick drying. That's the only thing that I 'think' I don't like about these sorts of nets. I'm used to using the coarse fishing ones that are pretty much dry with one shake these days. In this case, ideally we're clipping them to our backs/waists though so carrying a stinking wet net isn't a nice thought.
 

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Thats the one I use, cannot fault it thus far.
Thanks for that Mark. A few questions if you don't mind:-

What size one did you get?

What is the mesh like ... treble friendly?

Do you hang it off your belt, or attach it to your back somehow?
 

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Its quick drying, wide mesh, not the softest but not too harsh either, dries very quick. I use the belt clip on the net to hook onto the top ring of my Koa backpack, I can then reach behind me one handed and flick it open. The net body has been submerged repeatedly whilst wading and shows very few signs of corrosion after 1 and a half seasons, with just a quick rinse when I get back in, which is brilliant compared to a Rapala one I had which basically fell apart after literally two months.

And I would rather be carrying a wet net than a dry one.. ;-)
 

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Its quick drying, wide mesh, not the softest but not too harsh either, dries very quick. I use the belt clip on the net to hook onto the top ring of my Koa backpack, I can then reach behind me one handed and flick it open. The net body has been submerged repeatedly whilst wading and shows very few signs of corrosion after 1 and a half seasons, with just a quick rinse when I get back in, which is brilliant compared to a Rapala one I had which basically fell apart after literally two months.

And I would rather be carrying a wet net than a dry one.. ;-)
I am sold!

What size would you recommend ....16", 20" or 22"?
 

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Thanks for that Mark. Looks like a good piece of kit.
 
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