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Hi all,

I usually tend to only fish saltwater and am getting into the light rods,soft plastics side of things for wrasse,pollack,coalies etc etc, anyway I bought a great little 2-20 gr rod for that job and taught I would test it out first in the freshwater for a few perch.

I only ever fished for perch once and would appreciate any tips to get me started. I have bought little 40mm grubs in various colours and tiny jig heads which im told work well? What colours work best and whats the best way to fish them?

Thanks alot.
 

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Hi all,

I usually tend to only fish saltwater and am getting into the light rods,soft plastics side of things for wrasse,pollack,coalies etc etc, anyway I bought a great little 2-20 gr rod for that job and taught I would test it out first in the freshwater for a few perch.

I only ever fished for perch once and would appreciate any tips to get me started. I have bought little 40mm grubs in various colours and tiny jig heads which im told work well? What colours work best and whats the best way to fish them?

Thanks alot :-D
Small grubs in the 2-3 inch range will indeed work very well for perch, as will small shads in the same size range. However, if you are after specimen sized perch (2 to 4Ib) don’t discount larger soft plastics up to around the 5 inch mark. In fact, my best ever one-day perch haul (a total of 12 fish between 2.6Ib to 3.3Ib, with three fish exceeding 3Ib) came to a 5 inch Fox Chubby Shad that weighs in at 1 1/2 oz

Personally, I like yellow, white, black and fire tiger for perch soft plastics.

Don’t forget that spinners and spoon always has been, and very much still are, hugely effective perch catcher.
 
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Hi all,

I usually tend to only fish saltwater and am getting into the light rods,soft plastics side of things for wrasse,pollack,coalies etc etc, anyway I bought a great little 2-20 gr rod for that job and taught I would test it out first in the freshwater for a few perch.

I only ever fished for perch once and would appreciate any tips to get me started. I have bought little 40mm grubs in various colours and tiny jig heads which im told work well? What colours work best and whats the best way to fish them?

Thanks alot :-D
Most of my freshwater spinning is for perch. I can recommend Mepps spinners. If I am perch fishing they are the only lure I use. Try a Mepps Aglia size 2 or 3. If you are fishing clear water then use a copper colour, if there is a little colour in the water a gold is quite effective and if the water is dirty then a silver is the colour to use. However, unless the water is really dirty, I do tend to use copper most of the time, having caught 90% of my perch on that colour. I fish mostly in ex-gravel workings, which are nearly always clear unless there has been a lot of rain, usually in winter.

When I 'feel' a fish on I don't strike, I just gently 'ease' into it, regardless of whether it is a pike or a perch. Although when you have caught a few you can usually tell if it is a perch. As perch have a bony mouth the hooks do not always get a good hold. However if you play the perch carefully and net it as soon as it 'breaks surface' in front of you, then you will not lose many fish. I tend to fish with a long handled net floating in the water in front of me and once the fish has broken surface, scoop it up. Nine times out of ten the hooks will drop out of the perch when it is in the net.

I always tie a red tag on the treble hook of any Mepps that I use. Usually of red wool or one of the artificial materials that fly tyers use.

I have caught several perch of 4lb or more, as well as many perch between 2 - 4lb using this method.

Good luck

David
 

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Most of my freshwater spinning is for perch. I can recommend Mepps spinners. If I am perch fishing they are the only lure I use. Try a Mepps Aglia size 2 or 3. If you are fishing clear water then use a copper colour, if there is a little colour in the water a gold is quite effective and if the water is dirty then a silver is the colour to use. However, unless the water is really dirty, I do tend to use copper most of the time, having caught 90% of my perch on that colour. I fish mostly in ex-gravel workings, which are nearly always clear unless there has been a lot of rain, usually in winter.

When I 'feel' a fish on I don't strike, I just gently 'ease' into it, regardless of whether it is a pike or a perch. Although when you have caught a few you can usually tell if it is a perch. As perch have a bony mouth the hooks do not always get a good hold. However if you play the perch carefully and net it as soon as it 'breaks surface' in front of you, then you will not lose many fish. I tend to fish with a long handled net floating in the water in front of me and once the fish has broken surface, scoop it up. Nine times out of ten the hooks will drop out of the perch when it is in the net.

I always tie a red tag on the treble hook of any Mepps that I use. Usually of red wool or one of the artificial materials that fly tyers use.

I have caught several perch of 4lb or more, as well as many perch between 2 - 4lb using this method.

Good luck

David
the mepps black fury is also deadly
the one with the black blade and red dots and the bare hook (I don't like the one with the "dressed" trebles)
the red beads on the body seem to make them irresistable

i've caught lots of perch, pike and trout on them here, the UK, Italy, Oz and the US
I've even used them in saltwater in oz
they can be a little hard to find but they are worth it if you find them
i like them so much i also make my own copies using red chemically sharpened owner hooks

Nick
 

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I dug out this old photo, taken 10 years ago, I thought I would have a go for a Perch, having never done it before I had heard Mepps were good, so I put one on and had this 4lb beauty on my first ever cast for a Perch. That was easy!! :)

 

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Blimmin 'ell! Nice one Micky! I never targetted them properly, but spent years fishing freshwater and never had one over 3lb! Nice fishy!
 

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I dug out this old photo, taken 10 years ago, I thought I would have a go for a Perch, having never done it before I had heard Mepps were good, so I put one on and had this 4lb beauty on my first ever cast for a Perch. That was easy!! :)

BEAST! Do you get them in Jersey?
 

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A little birdy told me there are only two perch in that water **** and that's the small one? LOL
 

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Hi Ger, I fished the Barrow last Sunday and caught 20 perch, biggest 1lb. Small I know but I did'nt mind so long as they put a bend in my rod. I used a 2" Storm Shad curly tail on a 5g lead head. A big change from bass but with scaled down tackle it can be great craic.
 

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I’ve only been dropshotting for the last few months so still learning and improving but this is my personal guide based on my fishing. The most important thing to remember with dropshotting is that it is designed for finesse fishing so fast actioned rods are a no no. You need a softer tipped rod, quite “spongy” that won’t over-work the lure (over-working the lure with fast ctioned rods result in the lure darting and looping) which is very unnatural. Dropshotting is also for close range work, at this time of year the perch in my local waters are shoaled up, usually near structure and this technique allows me to work the lure for longer in the strike zone whilst at the same time allowing me to experiment with the presentation. (I find “pulsating” and “quivering” the lure the best). I`m currently using 6lb fluoro mainline on an 8`2” 3-18grm rod (very soft spongy tip but plenty of power in the mid to butt section) with 5,7,10 and 12grm dropshot weights (I use the round shaped ones) I hold the rod at around 120 degrees which enables me to impart as much action as I like but still allows enough angle to set the hook, keep the rod directly in front of you. To tie the drop shot I select the hook according to bait size and tie it (I start with the hook at 18 inches from the end which allows cutting/altering the fishing depth) using a polomar knot, after tying the polomar, take the tag end back through the eye which helps the hook to stand out at 90 degrees. Baits can be rigged texas, texsposed, nose hooked etc. (as for size I use anything from 1-6 inch dependant on profile but usually baits 4-6” have very slim profile or, are worm baits) 1-3” can be anything from grubs, paddletails, craws, creatures etc) The most important thing to remember is the weight of the dropshot, 5-12grm is fine for 1-3” baits but on worm baits upto 6” you need to be using heavier (anything from 15-30grms) and if dropshotting a river you need to start heavier to counter the flow. I am still experimenting with using circle hooks and nose mounted baits as well as with the use of scents and rattles so will hold back my findings until I have more of a definite pattern! “Low and slow” has been the principle I have used for a lot of my freshwater lure fishing during the winter months keeping the rig close to structure and cover or along shelf edges, drop-offs etc. One thing that is 100% proven is the hook-up rate which has been far superior to baits mounted on jigs. I snag-up far less and I am able to fish the bait exactly where I want and at any depth I want. This is just a quick basic guide to get you started. Hope it helps, any questions just ask!!!
 
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