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As the title suggests , what makes a pike water !! ? . Being a saltwater angler and knowing nothing much about the freshwater side of Angling , could somebody explain what it is that makes pike waters special ,
All i seem to know is that you can catch them in big puddles ( damed ) areas what about river caught pike .
 

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As the title suggests , what makes a pike water !! ? . Being a saltwater angler and knowing nothing much about the freshwater side of Angling , could somebody explain what it is that makes pike waters special ,
All i seem to know is that you can catch them in big puddles ( damed ) areas what about river caught pike .
Hi Bob

Lots of river caught Pike, the really big pike tend to be caught on trout lakes / res due to the high protein food source.

Iestyn will be on and give a detailed reply as he is the yoda of pike fishing
 

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I fish almost exclusively rivers, and the main things that make a pike water are:
1. Good supply of food- most rivers don't excel in this especially the small Kennet I fish, so the fish are often smaller.
2. Structure- pike are ambush predators and they attack their prey by darting out of cover in a short burst of speed, it is rare to find a pike cruising around searching for food, especially in rivers where they are constantly battling with the current so the more they move the more energy they must consume.
3. Deep holes/water- this does not apply to all rivers however in most shallower small rivers the pike will hide out in deeper water waiting for food.
4. Current lines- pike will be waiting out of the current waiting for a passing meal, and also smaller food items will congregate in the "eddies" and slacks attracting the prey fish, also the pike can avoid the main current conserving energy.

The above points also apply to perch, however when you look at targeting chub they often inhabit slightly different haunts.
Hope that help.
Joe
 

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All of the above plus a fair degree of management by whoever controls the water in many cases. Some waters deliberately thin out the pike numbers in order to allow the remaining ones to grow larger. Too many pike puts strain on the food chain and in turn reduces the average size of the pike. In reservoirs where there is a plentiful supply of food they reduce the numbers of pike to also allow the other fish to thrive. Careful management is definitely required.
 

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Bob,
I don't know if there is a definitive answer to that one. If you introduce pike to almost any thriving water it be successful and establish itself. We have lots of small drainage rivers in Lincolnshire. The large ones are 30+ feet across, the smaller streams that feed them no more than 10 to 12 feet wide. Yet we have some of the largest river pike in the country. 34 & 38lb fish have been caught locally if I remember correctly. There's no doubt that the biggest fish in weight and numbers will be in the big trout reservoirs where there are huge heads of course fish and introduced trout. They can't lose in that situation the food keeps being brought to them. As long as there's plenty of food they will thrive in almost any water.
 
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i am also itching to have a go for pike with lures but i could do with an almost beginers guide regarding handling them anyone got a link or advice themselves?
 

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Bob, Keith

I will be organising a Pike only Bumble at the end of Jan, start of Feb next year at Bosherston and staying in the National Trust Cottages there, more info to follow soon :p
 
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Thats one hell of a question Bob, something that I've spent the weekend reading up on (Pike. Gay & Rickards) and pondering over! You could say that it all depends on what sort of pike fishery you want to fish? ie, loads of smaller pike with few larger fish( excellent spawning, no/few other predators = lots of smaller pike) , lower numbers of pike but more reaching a med to large size , would be classed as a well balanced fishery with goodnumbers of doubles + a few twenties to back up the jacks (classic pyramid) The opposite of the first example would be an inverted pyramid, ie, good numbers of twenties with ever decreasing numbers of the back weights. All three of these hypothetical waters (assuming the same food supply) would hold a similar total net weight (biomass) of pike but all give very good pike fishing! All could produce a thirty as the major predator of smaller pike is large pike, so the in the first example the predator would also become part of the forage base, if one can grow big enough to exploit this otherwise unexploited resource! This is a gross oversimplyfication (?) of the subject and possibly isn't quite what you asked, so more on rivers near,ish to you later.
 

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If you are really serious about piking then I suggest that folk read Mike Ladle's book out last year... I did a review of it on my blog last December or January... I bet you that most will overlook this book and go for books written by those on the pike circus... Mike has applied a great amount of his scientific knowledge to this book... if you want to crack the code this will assist greatly!

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Tactical-Pike-Fishing-Mike-Ladle/dp/1847971393

In fact this book should be banned as it gives anglers an unfair advantage! :D
 

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Keith I may be a relative novice for pike with lures but for many years, I spent most winters deadbaiting and have unhooked loads of pike to nearly 30lb. For what its worth this is basically my approach to unhooking.

Firstly be organised, have everything you need for landing, unhooking (and weighing if necessary) to hand. Small pike can be gloved out (using a thick glove or I use a purpose made mesh gloves) by gently lifting underneath the gill cover (best shown by someone who has done it) avoiding touching the gills. Always make sure you can see where the hooks are before doing this as you may end up with a handful of trebles otherwise! I dont like this with large pike as I think the weight of the pike puts a lot of stress on the gill cover. Keep a firm hold as often even a small pike will thrash a bit and you dont want to drop her or get hooks in your hand! Onto the unhooking mat. If you use a net, then obviously straight onto the unhooking mat. I like the fish upside down and kneel astride the fish as my (ample) arse will stop the fish thrashing and possibly hurting itself. Obviously my weight isnt on the fish, just gently holding it down. A pikes top jaw doesnt move - only the lower jaw so the trace can be used to gently lift the lower jaw up (its upside down) and give you a view of the hooks. I always use barbless hooks so long handled forceps or pliers generally do the trick. If the hooks are particularly deep set, you can access hooks via the gill cover carefully albeit that should be unlikely with lures. Get the trace or lure well away so it doesnt catch on you or the fish. I always carry a pair of very long handled side cutters and if a hook is particularly deep (usually bad angling) then I will cut the hook shank but I really dont want to leave a full treble in her throat as this may effectively seal the throat with the inevitable consequences.

I have never felt pike are a particularly hardy fish compared to say carp and so I like them back in the water asap. Gently slip her back in the water and hold her to ensure she is fit and well. She should release herself by swimming away - a good sign she is feeling strong! If she seems lethargic, you can encourage water through the gills by gently moving her back and forward in the water until she swims off.

The likes of Iestyn or Steve Lewis may also comment and I would bow to their superior knowledge but I dont think the pike (or you!) should come to too much harm if you use this method until you establish your own ways. They are a magnificent fish, my favourite fresh water species and deserved to be treated with the utmost respect as I am sure anyone on this Forum would do.
 
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Great post Andrew and I agree with every thing you have said, the only thing I would add would be not to use lip grips as these have the potential to cause damage to a lively thrashing Pike. Iestyn has taught me a lot, so nothing beats fishing with someone experienced to learn the ropes :p
 

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Thanks Steve and I agree about Bogas. I know there is debate about their use in general but definitely not for pike!
 

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Thanks for that Andrew i found that very usefull still haven't been out to try for pike yet just not had the time will be trying soon though thanks again
 
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