"Unnatural" Lure Colours. | Lure Anglers Forum - Lure Fishing Forum UK (Bass, wrasse..)
Forum Supporting Contributions Upgrade Here

"Unnatural" Lure Colours.

Discussion in 'Lures' started by {name}, Apr 27, 2017.

  1. Wrasse

    592
    460
    63
    Location:
    Brigg England
    I have been sorting through all of my tackle in preparation for an upcoming trip to Ireland. As normal, in spite of having far too many lures of all description, I couldn't resist ordering a few more. What struck me was how many I ordered were in what I call "unnatural" colours. Now, I have fly fished for most of my life and I have always preferred fishing imitative flies rather lures the vast majority of the time. I will fish lures when they are feeding on fry for example but that's just another case of matching the hatch, so to speak.
    Anyway, this carried over into my lure selection when I started bass fishing in a serious way. All of my lures were of the AYU/sandeel type colours or those that I thought most closely resembled small bait fish. I don't actually think there were a great deal of garish coloured lures and finishes readily available back then anyway. As bass lure fishing became more popular then the variety and colours of lures on the market became more and more varied and easier to buy. I started to notice that colours such as cotton candy were becoming popular but I still resisted, just didn't seem right to me somehow. I even had a few experiences of being completely outfished by mates using these things but I just put it down to "one of those things." I think things came to a head a few years ago in Ireland. A friend and I were fishing virtually side by side and both using Feed Shallow's. I had the green sandeel one and he was using one of the chartreuse coloured jobs. He hammered me! He had around thirty bass to my six or seven. That was it for me, I started to buy lures in colours that I wouldn't have dreamt of previously. These last few years I have nearly gone full circle and my first choice of colour is nearly always cotton candy. I have read about what a fish is supposed to see, it's double cones, what colours disappear in the water, u.v. light etc etc but the inescapable fact, to me, is that when I clip on an "unnatural" coloured lure then I feel confident of catching. I know confidence in fishing is a great thing but I felt the same using what I deemed as "natural" colours just a few years ago.
    Sorry for such a long winded post but I have got a bad case of cabin fever and can't see me wetting a line for bass until June. Be interested to read your views on the subject.

    Sent from my E6633 using Tapatalk
     
    • Like Like x 5
    • Informative Informative x 2
    • Dislike Dislike x 1
  2. Striper

    3,306
    2,679
    113
    Location:
    United Kingdom
    To me, and I dont know why, candy is a bass magnet!
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
    • Informative Informative x 1
  3. Salmon

    6,673
    4,306
    113
    Location:
    St Clement, Jersey
    There seems to be occasions when a certain garish colour will out-fish others, but the problem is trying to work out when that is!

    I predominantly use natural colour lures. My thinking is that I will be imitating bait 100% of the time, giving me a decent shout of catching 100% of the time. With vivid purple or some other crazy hue, it may slay on its day, but equally may be completely off the mark.
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
  4. Wrasse

    592
    460
    63
    Location:
    Brigg England
    That's exactly how I used to think, Mark. Agree it can be a problem working it out but the cotton candy seems, to me at least, a colour I can use confidently nearly all the time. Most of my other garish colours are various shades of white, chartreuse and pink. What I have found is that if I start on one those colours and don't catch then I revert back to naturals pretty smartish. When I used to fish predominantly naturals then I would only switch to a brighter colour often as a last resort. That way I barely gave the brighter colours a chance and my catch rates on them reflected this. By starting off on them this has reversed the process....if you understand what I am trying to say.

    Sent from my E6633 using Tapatalk
     
  5. Salmon

    6,673
    4,306
    113
    Location:
    St Clement, Jersey
    I get completely your thoughts Peter, but I think to me it's a variable that I don't understand fully the consequences of, and therefore am not really willing to fiddle with.

    I'm happiest when I see my lure in the water and it looks just like the bait fish in the water.

    There are other variables I understand better, lure size or profile, that I personally think have if not a stronger bearing, certainly have an effect I can better understand.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  6. Bass

    1,220
    1,153
    113
    Location:
    In Hiding
    Can't vouch for Bass as I don't catch enough to say, but Pollock can be mighty finicky. Too many times I've been throwing silver metals out with nothing happening and then try pink and wallop. Softs are the same, I had some strange concoctions of colours catch but one uv out fish all others.
    Seen too many cotton candy hp's dragging in Bass, yet never had confidence in them myself.
    I will be intreagued to see the resulting posts.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  7. Perch

    412
    284
    63
    Location:
    Swansea
    I am no expert or consistent catcher of bas but
    I find the chartreuse much more effective when there's colour in the water, a state that is quite usual in my local estuary and the Bristol channel. Still to catch on cotton candy but I only have a skimmer in it.
     
  8. Guest

    314
    255
    63
    Location:
    england
    Never caught on cotton candy ,my go to lure are more natural colours .
    Lately transparent (re bay ruf thread ) and it works well . I think its the general impression that gets a bass to take , although what the hell do they think a dot crawler is ??
     
  9. Pollock Supporting Member

    1,893
    1,247
    113
    Location:
    UK
    Are they attacking imitations?
    Are they going for sihouettes?
    At depth are some colours being filtered out?
    Is an agressive/territorial response being stimulated?
    Have you seen that video where a man's pet sticklebacks get agitated every time the post van goes by his window, just because its red, and male sticklebacks have red bellies...............................
    It doesnt work every time, and Pike aren't sea fish, but I had one whole autumn where goldfish was THE colour, and, after naturals, I would always try Firetiger next on my rivers.
    On the river Nile a mate is massively more confident with bright yellow/black stripe lures.
    My brother had loads of Irish bass on a purple and white Yozuri Emperor minnow.
    Have a few weird colours, use them when you are getting takes, or when you aren't.
    Being totally stuffed out of sight one day by those goldfish lures certainly made me think about not always trying to match the hatch.............When it works, it can sometimes work much better than normal colours.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  10. Wrasse

    592
    460
    63
    Location:
    Brigg England
    Exactly my own findings and thoughts, that's why I start off on them nowadays.

    Sent from my E6633 using Tapatalk
     
  11. Blenny

    107
    121
    43
    Location:
    Oxford
    Great thread , I tend to go with lifelike colours & change to brights when conditions dictate.
     
  12. Salmon

    6,673
    4,306
    113
    Location:
    St Clement, Jersey
    The goldfish example as above, I have heard that before. And having red on perch lures. And the purple lures working and so on, it proves that there are times that there are key colours that work very well, but when, and what colour???? That's the thing that stops me a bit.

    So you fish a luminous orange lure, then a pink one, but on the day the key colour was electric blue, do you cycle through the rainbow until you find the colour? I'm not going to do that, instead I'll pop on a subtle brown or green silvery pattern to mirror bait, as my sessions are not that long, and I don't have that many lures! I suppose I'm more comfortable using the old mantra 'match the hatch'.

    There are probably some superb results to be had if you learn very specific colours at certain times, but it's a hell of a lot of work to put in to narrow it down!

    I certainly agree with chartreuse/pearl in coloured water though.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  13. Pollock Supporting Member

    1,893
    1,247
    113
    Location:
    UK
    I suppose the thing in freshwater, is that you often have a good idea that the fish should be there, so you can try something well different, if choice 1 doesn't work. In the sea that pod of bass might come through your mark looking for baitfish........three casts after you changed to something outlandish........which then scares the shit out of them!
    I also think in freshwater you may well be fishing for fish that have been caught on lures before. Its not necessarily a specific colour that catches them, just something different from what hurt last time......
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
    • Informative Informative x 1
  14. Pollock

    1,376
    574
    113
    Location:
    hayle cornwall
    You may have both been using feed shallows, but did you have the same reels with the same gearing? Same amount of braid with the same diameter ? Exact Same retrieve rate etc etc? There's so many variables. I personally don't think a fish cares what colour a lure is. It is after all rattling three treble hooks around and swimming like a mental attached to clips and braid. Do they see colour but not hooks and other hardware?
    Profile, speed, depth could all be just as important as colour in my book. Some days any one of these things can be a Stand out factor at any one time. On another note, I see cotton candy as bieng a fairly natural colour. Cheers
     
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2017
  15. Tarpon

    11,810
    13,418
    113
    Location:
    Gone West
    I'm a big believer in colour choice being a big deal. I have favourite colours for particular conditions, and I've also experienced switches to 'unnatural' colours paying dividends. I always have a selection of so-say unnatural with me on a session.

    I've had sessions when I've been on serious numbers of bass, and therefore had the opportunity to play around with changes in colour, and found pretty stark results around bass favouring one colour over others on a particular day. I've experienced enough of this to convince me.
     
    • Informative Informative x 5
    • Like Like x 1
  16. Sea Trout

    895
    653
    93
    Location:
    Kernow
    Simon ,
    Are your sessions mainly Daytime, night or both ?
     
  17. Tarpon

    11,810
    13,418
    113
    Location:
    Gone West
    Both.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  18. Sea Trout

    895
    653
    93
    Location:
    Kernow
    Cheers Simon,
     
  19. Pollock

    1,376
    574
    113
    Location:
    hayle cornwall
    I absolutely have to respect your judgement 100% Simon as you are a shite frigging hot bass tracker and catcher mate.
    But what do you think about the other things I mentioned? Size, profile, speed , depth of retrieve and line thickness for drifting lures? Do you think it's a combination of all or only some? If colour is #1 for you what else do you then consider?
    Cheers
     
    Last edited: Apr 29, 2017
  20. Tarpon

    11,810
    13,418
    113
    Location:
    Gone West
    I definately agree with your other points Lee. There are days when bass will hit a range of lures presented differently, but those days are limited. I find more often that finding a more limited range of lure presentation is important. I've seen bass focus on topwater versus divers, hitting lures retrieved at either extreme of speed (interesting how often they want a lure cranked at warp 9 - how many anglers are yet to try a big topwater cranked quickly ?), I've seen catches drop by increasing line b/s by 5lbs, and I've seen them focus on either small or large profiles. The difference in catch rates we experience is down to attention to detail in my opinion.

    I only spoke about colour in my previous post, as that was the subject at hand.

    I always think of it as being similar to fishing a still trout pond with a fly rod. You know 100% that the fish are there, but on many occasions they are fussy, and you have to cycle through some options until you find the pattern that triggers them that day ... a red buzzer drifted, a green nymph twitched, an orange feathery monstrosity cranked. When bass fishing, we have the added doubt of not knowing if the bass are infront of us, but by assuming that they are, and taking the same systematic approach, we can increase our chances of a catch. All about that last 5% of detail.
     
    • Like Like x 3
    • Agree Agree x 1
    • Winner Winner x 1

Share This Page