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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Apologies if this has been covered before but having spent 20 + years chasing trout, now that the lure fishing for bass bug has hit, I want to spend more time with the fly rod. I tend to fish 4 and 5 weight rods for most of my small, still water trout fishing using small nymphs so I am a bit inexperienced at bigger flies and heavier lines. I have a 7 weight rod but struggled a bit casting heavy flies but did get a few bass this year with it.

I was hoping for advice from you guys but I was thinking of getting a 9 weight rod so that I can at least cope with some onshore breeze and bigger flies (plus would be useful if I ever get to somewhere there are Bonefish!). I hate the thought of such a heavy rod but at least I should be able to cope with typical shore conditions and heavier flies.

While I am at it, I appreciate that the choice of floating/sinking lines depends on circumstances and anticipated depth of the fish but for general use, would I be right to go for a slow sinker as my first saltwater line?

Thanks in anticipation.
 

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Andrew I use a 9# normally but sometimes if it is calm an 8# for bass, pollack etc & a 6 # for mullet.

I would say either an intermediate or ghost tip (floating line with intermediate tip), those are the two lines that I use the most but I find the ghost tip the most useful, however i am fishing off beach locations. If you are fishing in deeper water you would be better with a sinking line & don't forget a floating line for fishing over weed beds shallow rock marks etc.
 

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Hi Andrew, I use two rods a 9wt for coastal work and a 6wt for Estuary/Schoolie work both are Sage Xi2 4 piece Saltwater rods that way when I'm working overseas they can fit in the overhead lockers, I generally use two types of line one being a floater the other and more useful in my opinion a clear intermediate.

Hope that helps.......
 

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Andrew a nice rd for you would be the Greys GRXI+ 8/9 weight fanastic liitle rod. I have the slightly older GRXI version and use it for sea trout/salmon
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for all the replies guys! I think 9 weight will fill a gap as i have several 6 weight rods and one 7 weight which will suffice for shorter range/calmer conditions and mullet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Hi Robert, good to hear from you. I am setting off tomorrow at the crack of dawn and looking forward to catching up with you and the boys this weekend. I will bring a fly rod just in case!
 

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Andrew when mullet fishing mate opt for a 6wt with a through action much better rod for playing them as they will often make a final surging run rom under the rod tip.
 

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I think much of depends upon whether.....

You are a distance and strip monger or....

A presentation angler.


If the former, choose a 9wt

If the latter, a good 8wt with both a 8wt long front taper WF or DT lines and, for close work and night fishing, a 9, or 10wt line on that very same rod.

I use similar systems from 4wt through 10.

Most salt fly rods are 'too fast' unless throwing tiny 'bonefish type' flies. Overlining slows em up to mid actioned but you have to adjust your cast accordingly and rely upon single speys and not carrying too much line in a cast. Tight loops look great but rarely achieve anything other than die straight lines on the water or, broken rod tips with weighted flies. Neither are very productive for the presentation angler.

just my opinion..
 

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Keith i agree with the heavier weights though for presentation when they are 10ft from you a 6wt comes into its own with size 16 chorporium mate and the action absorbs more when fishing 5-6lb flurocarbon tippets.
 

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So much of this choice depends where you are fishing and the conditions your fishing in.
Open shore, windy conditions, then you will be greatful of the wind beating power of a #10, I agree that inparticular over lining when night fishing can help get the hang of it. But in the long run line speed rules in windy conditions. Shooting heads are another good idea-easy to carry and change.
Sheltered areas, short range fishing then and #8 is plenty.
Be honest about your casting abilities, if in doubt go up a line weight, as if you end up struggling to fish-then you won't enjoy the experience. Their nothing clever or skillful about fishing too light, your just making it hard for yourself.

One thing I would ask people to think about before spending silly money on a top of the range fly rod, is power-not in the casting, but when fighting the fish. Some rods are MUCH MUCH better in this respect than others, and paying more does not mean a better rod. Sage is a good example, great casting rods, but no guts to the rod in a fight. You hook a 8lb bass on rough ground-then the rod had better have power, or you won't be getting your hands on that fish.
One more thing, in windy weather, or when learning to fish at night-Wear eye protection!!!! Seen accidents, and had other peoples flies stuck in me-just not worth the risk.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thanks again for the help fellas. I totally agree about eye protection and my casting is quite reasonable but its all too easy to get a fly in the eye.

I think that the problem we have with Sussex beaches is that if we get an onshore wind we dont have the nice little bays or coves that exist elsewhere, hence I feel that I need a 9 weight in the armoury to get a line out. I have had fun this year in estuaries with a 7 weight rod when the wind has been kind but stuggled punching out from the shore into wind.

I take Keiths point about fast actioned rods and I have a preference for medium/fast actioned rod and avoid the very tippy rods as it suits my casting style. Although I have a soft spot for Sage rod for nymphing, fly rods are definitely rods that you really want to have a cast with before you part with a wad of cash so I will go cheap to get me going.

I have heard good things about the Greys GRXi range, any other rods that might be recomended|
 

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Some good deals on Hardy Zane rods about at the moment, circa £200 so around half price (presumably clearing out stock to make room for the Syntrixs), nice rods, usual Hardy refinements, just a shame they come fitted with snakes

I'm trying to resist the temptation to get one in a 6wt but I really dont need another fly rod .. i really dont ... I dont .. :rolleyes:
 

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Andrew,
If you cam find one, Thomas and Thomas Horizon rods are simply the best saltwater rods I have ever been lucky enough to cast. Easy to cast, handle fish like a dream. really worth trying to find one on the net.
Personally I wouldn't pay the money for Sage or a Greys, But I would have a very close look at these, a Mate just got a #10, and it is ALOT of rod for the money.

http://www.albrightflyfishing.com/items/xxt-fly-rods/xxt-990-4-detail.htm
 
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Andrew

I use a Greys GRXI & it's a cracking rod.

I also have one of these in 9' 9# I got it off these guys a while ago, current price £79 & free shipping from Denmark it's here in about three days

http://www.scandicfly.dk/17-ajensen-aht-advanced-helical-taper-.html

The above, as recommended by Mr Jim Hendrick are currently selling for about £300. I have found a place in Denmark that has them on sale at £79
 
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