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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I'm really interested in the "Wrasse follow the sun" theory. Just thinking of a few reasons why it might be (if it is even partly accurate)...

If anybody has any to add or remove, says so!


1) Weed (their preferred habitat - at least for shelter?) grows best in unshaded areas? - so this is where the fish are found.

2) Colours underwater are more vivid in sun-lit areas than in the shade - so coloured baits are more aggressively hit here than in the shade? (this doesn't explain the success of neutral coloured baits, but depth and colour absorption could come in to play there...)

3) It is less down to the Wrasses preference, but perhaps more their prey? Do gobies (for example) prefer sun-lit areas? Is it just a food-chain thing? I think you could almost guarentee (like in a dirty bucket full of sludge) that tiny invertebrates will themselves follow the sun! (I've spent a lot of time around dirty buckets!)

4) Wrasse grow slowly. How much do they eat? If it's not actually that much then could they crave the slight temperature difference between shaded and unshaded areas - to give them a bit of a 'happy' boost?

5) Their eye's adapt very slowly to changing light levels. A bass's eyes adapt very quickly (while the eyes of their prey don't adapt so quickly - which is partly why dawn and dusk can be so productive), but are Wrasse slower at waking up in the morning and adapting to different levels through the day (so they stay in the sun)? This could explain their apparent morning laziness?

They're all slightly linked, but anybody else have any ideas to add?
 

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I'm really interested in the "Wrasse follow the sun" theory. Just thinking of a few reasons why it might be (if it is even partly accurate)...

If anybody has any to add or remove, says so!


1) Weed (their preferred habitat - at least for shelter?) grows best in unshaded areas? - so this is where the fish are found.
I think maybe that might hold water close to the high shoreline.

2) Colours underwater are more vivid in sun-lit areas than in the shade - so coloured baits are more aggressively hit here than in the shade? (this doesn't explain the success of neutral coloured baits, but depth and colour absorption could come in to play there...)
True, colours are more visible at depth in high lux levels. However, matching or blending has been extremely successful. If you look at bottom fodder, it generally blends in to it's surroundings. Evolution would have hell to pay if that were not the case.

3) It is less down to the Wrasses preference, but perhaps more their prey? Do gobies (for example) prefer sun-lit areas? Is it just a food-chain thing? I think you could almost guarentee (like in a dirty bucket full of sludge) that tiny invertebrates will themselves follow the sun! (I've spent a lot of time around dirty buckets!)
Actually, understand the prey understand the predator comes to mind here. I'm currently reading a gobie book. serious.

4) Wrasse grow slowly. How much do they eat? If it's not actually that much then could they crave the slight temperature difference between shaded and unshaded areas - to give them a bit of a 'happy' boost?
Unknown. I think a few studies out the UK have been done that might offer relevance though.

5) Their eye's adapt very slowly to changing light levels. A bass's eyes adapt very quickly (while the eyes of their prey don't adapt so quickly - which is partly why dawn and dusk can be so productive), but are Wrasse slower at waking up in the morning and adapting to different levels through the day (so they stay in the sun)? This could explain their apparent morning laziness?
Most aggressive times are lower, or changing light periods either end of the day or, mid day, should heavy cloud ensue. Their eyesight may not be that good. I don't know. Maybe they are just tuned differently because it is about the only fish I've not caught reguarly in darkness.

Good thread Ben and one which I think we may get some better idea's on as we continue to fish lures for this worthy species.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks mate. Exactly, we can just keep it rolling as ideas develop. I might start looking more in to Gobies and Wrasse senses (if there's much out there).
 

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It's all studies done by government research groups.
A bit technical at times (even for geeks like us) but I'm sure you'll manage.

I'm reading another on the lifecycle of seaweeds in great britain too.

Oh, btw...

Gobies are sperated into...

high
mid tidal
low tidal

and

into favouring green weed, red weed or both.

Wrasse know where they live and so should we.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Interesting. Been looking for some decent bedtime reading for a while! Will see what I can find. Girlfriend's gonna think I'm a complete freak when I start reading about weed and tiny fish.
 

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It's nice to see you are thinking about this stuff.

Although lure fishing is fairly new to me I've been fly fishing for a few years, entomology plays a big part in trout fishing. You wouldnt believe the books I have on aquatic insects! If you undertsand their preys habits and environments then you have a far better chance of catching them. The first thing I did when I started bass fishing was buy a few books that gave me info about their feeding habits and habitat.

I guess that's why I enjoy lure fishing just as much now, it's progressive. Far better than chucking out a lump of bait and waiting......and waiting........zzzzZZZZzzzz

I do think people could learn a lot from fluff chucking, there are so many disciplines and methods in the sport that could enhance the way we lure fish.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I do think people could learn a lot from fluff chucking, there are so many disciplines and methods in the sport that could enhance the way we lure fish.
Definitely Chad. Its great that we're all from different backgrounds. Since lure fishing is (to this extreme) new in comparison to most other types of fishing in the UK, we've all come from somewhere else originally. Whether it's bait fishing at sea, coarse, carp or fly... They're all relevant to eachother if you want to make the most of it I think. I was quite successful in coarse competitions before starting with the lures when I moved closer to the sea a couple of years ago. Its surprising how much knowledge of other disceplines can help you think outside the lure fishing 'box'.
 
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